Vertical flight efficiency

@ airports

Improved vertical flight efficiency during climb (CCO) and descent (CDO) can save substantial amounts of fuel and CO2 and also reduce noise levels in the vicinity of airports. The lower the level segment, the higher the additional fuel consumption.

Together with interested stakeholders and EUROCONTROL’s Environment Unit, the PRC has developed a methodology to compute level off segments during climb and descent at airports.

The results are shown in the dashboard below and also available for download in our data repository.

Please note that the analysis may take a few moments to load. The dashboard is best viewed in Chrome or Firefox.

In order to get a better understanding of the level of vertical inefficiency in the en-route phase, the PRC has developed a methodology to compare the maximum altitudes in the flight plans of flights between a specific airport pair with the maximum altitudes of flights between similar airport pairs for a specific AIRAC cycle.


Vertical en-route flight efficiency

In order to get a better understanding of the level of vertical inefficiency in the en-route phase, the PRC has developed a methodology compare the maximum altitudes in the flight plans of flights between a specific airport pair with the maximum altitudes of flights between similar airport pairs for a specific AIRAC cycle.

The analysis does not aim at quantifying the total amount of vertical en-route inefficiencies (VFI) in the EUROCONTROL area nor does it identify all underlying reasons for the observed inefficiencies. Instead, it provides an initial understanding of the level of vertical flight inefficiencies on specific airport pairs in order to evaluate some cases in more detail. It should be noted that there might be good reasons for certain vertical restrictions (safety, capacity) and the results should therefore be interpreted in this context.